The Canadian Positive Psychology Association 2018: John Helliwell on Global Happiness, Plus Bill Craig and Jay Gosselin

The Canadian Positive Psychology Association 2018: John Helliwell on Global Happiness, Plus Bill Craig and Jay Gosselin

Mark Franklin was your Career Buzz correspondent interviewing keynoters and speakers on-site at the Canadian Positive Psychology Association’s 2018 Conference in Toronto.  The CPPA promotes the science and practice of positive psychology – and facilitates collaboration among researchers, practitioners, teachers, and students in Canada. Up first is John Helliwell. Over the past decade and supported in part by the World Happiness Report there’s growing interest in learning more about what can actually be done to support happier lives globally. John Helliwell, tells us how. He is Professor Emeritus in the Vancouver School of Economics at the Univery of British Columbia. From 2016 to 2017, he was also Senior Fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. Recent books of John’s include Well-Being for Public Policy, International Differences in Well-Being, and six editions of The World Happiness Report edited with Jeffrey Sax. John is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and Officer of the Order of Canada. John was truly the inspiring keynote speaker at this year’s CPPA conference. Next, Bill Craig is President and Board Chair of the Canadian Positive Psychology Association. He’s passionate about stregthening well-being literacy and developing well-being policies and strategies to support human thriving. For the last six years, Bill has been actively involved in the broad based multidisciplinary assessment of well- being, happiness, and quality of life at the community, business, municipal, and regional levels. Bill’s specialty is how to use well-being assessment to bring about whole system changes to policies, programs, and services. (Interview at 00:23:30) Lastly, Jay Gosselin was uninspired by the career prospects after studying economics, so he decided to take to the open seas where he worked as a cruise director. In 2007, he worked on the Olympic Games, and then a job at the University of Ottawa in recruitment, and later a Master’s Degree in Counseling. Now, Jay runs MentorU. He believes your twenties are for building your experience, thirties are for building your expertise, and your forties and fifties are for building your dreams. (Interview at 00:39:00)

About the Author:

Leave A Comment