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Dec
14

Monthly Archives: December 2012

The Career Clinic author. Terry Fallis’s storied career. How to love school

Dec
14

What should you do if you or someone you know is considering a post-secondary program but unsure it’s a fit?

Try before you buy, is the advice from Nov. 28 show’s guest, Luis Figueroa, drummer for Arizona Lily. He was considering the Jazz Music program at Humber College in Toronto, so he took some courses and workshops in advance. “It made me love the school. I met teachers ahead of time. I’d recommend it to anyone.” He enrolled, and graduated.

What does Luis suggest for people with an artistic gift and wondering whether to pursue it as a career? “Keep at it, keep the patience!” Listen to the whole interview (Luis starts at minute 22:30).

Wondering what next in your own career story? Or, looking for a way to help someone you know in theirs? Take advantage of our seasonal offer of 45% off an Exploratory Consultation and get thinking in a new way, right away, about your career and life.
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Award-winning authors of The Career Clinic, and The Best Laid Plans.

December 12, 2012


Click to listen or download

Maureen Anderson is the host of The Career Clinic radio show based in Fargo, ND, and airs on 86 stations across the US. She’s author of The Career Clinic: Eight Simple Rules for Finding Work You Love. The book is based on her radio show of the same name, and shares the inspiring personal stories of people who have made dramatic career transitions. A civil engineering graduate, Maureen held a positions in management and sales before getting into radio. Maureen is an award-winning journalist and author, with Jon Hovde, of Left for Dead: A Second Life after Vietnam, which won a Minnesota Book Award. Maureen is also a public speaker, who inspires people to take a more active role in writing the story of their lives. Tune in for a sampling of Maureen’s career stories!

terryTerry Fallis has a career that spans politics, public relations, novel writing, and engineering. He’s the author of The Best Laid Plans which won the 2008 Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour. It was crowned the winner of CBC Canada Reads as the “essential Canadian novel of the decade.” Terry’s third novel, Up and Down, debuted in September 2012 on the Globe and Mail bestsellers list. After earning an engineering degree, Terry used a liberal dose of career-change special-sauce and swapped applied science for applied political science and joined then future Prime Minister Jean Chretien’s staff. He worked in politics for four more years before becoming a communications consultant eventually leading an agency for Hill and Knowlton. In 1995, Terry co-founded communications agency Thornley Fallis. Terry also co-hosts the popular business podcast, Inside PR. A homebuilt hovercraft plays a supporting role in The Best Laid Plans. Dial us in to hear Terry Fallis’s thing for hovercrafts, and the twists and turns in his multi-chaptered career story.

PLUS, join in for our new feature, Career Buzz Conversations. This week’s topic: building a career in an area beyond what you studied. Call in or email me with your comments and questions as co-host Melissa Rodway and I spark the conversation!

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

Why do we give more thought to what brand of jeans to buy than a career plan?

Dec
03

“Too many of the young and jobless have given more thought to what brand of jeans to buy than their career plan,” writes Neil Sandell in an article entitled Career education lacking in Canada  in the Atkinson Series on youth unemployment published in the Toronto Star.

It’s not just youth who suffer from lack of career clarification; adults too lack career clarity. We spend 100,000 hours in our careers, so why do we invest so little time – some estimates put it at less than 20 hours for the average Canadian – in focused career planning and exploration?

Sandell says that, for youth, the problem is a combination of unhelpful advice from parents, patchy career education, lack of career exploration experience, among other factors. You can hear more in my interview with Neil Sandell on Career Buzz.

From my perspective leading a busy career management social enterprise, CareerCycles, serving individual clients of all ages and stages, it’s a mess out there. Career management is arguably the most important 21st century skill, and yet the vast majority of Canadians don’t possess a high enough level of that skill, don’t realize they can learn it, and don’t know where to turn.

Our career management profession is still flying under the radar screen of most Canadians. Good for Sandell, the Atkinson Foundation, and the Toronto Star for increasing the quality of the dialogue on this critical problem.

What to do about our youth? Sure there’s valuable career information out there, including useful tools like Career Cruising. But, “does good information alone launch a teenager on a career path?” asks Sandell.

He quotes Dutch researcher, Frans Meijers, who says youth “‘make use of the information but only after they have made the choice on a gut level.’ Meijers says the indispensable ingredient is experience.”

“He [Meijers] compares making a career choice to finding a romantic partner. We don’t begin by reading up on the conditions of the relationship market. We start by dating, by gaining experience. For a student to make a career decision that is ‘heartfelt and lasting, you need to create opportunities for experiential learning — especially in the workplace.’”

I think Meijers has it right. He spoke passionately about this in my Career Buzz interview with Frans Meijers.

One Toronto Star reader commented online: “How about bringing back Grade 13 as a co-op year for all students? Half time spent in the classroom over two terms, and half time spent in 3 or 4 different co-op placements?”

Not a bad idea! Join the dialogue on this important 21st century issue. What are your thoughts?

Join in on Twitter: follow Neil Sandell @youngnjobless, and me @careercycles

-mf

 

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

 

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