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Apr
25

Monthly Archives: April 2012

Volunteer to be a millionair​e ~ What can you learn from cherry blossoms?

Apr
25

April 25, 2012


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Michael Gustar was a probationary officer until he went back to college to study volunteer management, got a job at the humane society, and then his career “went to the dogs!” Now as the Manager of Agency and Volunteer Resources at Volunteer Hamilton he’ll share stories of how he helps thousands of people connect to meaningful volunteer opportunities.

When Shawn Kelly retired at age 47 after 30 years working at Stelco, he ramped up his own volunteer activities and now advocates and presents on the value of volunteering to develop your career. Shawn says volunteer opportunities can transform your resume “from blah to amazing.” He’ll share insights from his forthcoming book, “Volunteer to Be a Millionaire.”

As a volunteer president and chair of the Toronto Cyclists Union, Heather McDonald will share with listeners all about her skill-building and career-enhancing experiences. Inspire your life, empower your career, enrich your week. Career Buzz is on Wednesday, April 25, 11am-noon Eastern, 89.5 FM in Toronto or online http://ciut.fm/index.php/about/listen-live/.

Sparks from Career Buzz of April 11

Youth unemployment was the topic, and recent grad Peter Donnan joined us to talk about his unpaid internship and how by making himself indispensible, he got an offer for a full time job. CBC radio producer Neil Sandell has been studying the problem of youth unemployment, and he highlighted for listeners that there are 200,000 fewer jobs for youth in Canada now compared to before the recession. “We need to encourage a culture of great internships,” he said. Listen to the whole interview.

CareerCycles Tip: If you’re a recent grad, or know one, take in Peter Donnan’s advice: “It’s never too early to start looking for your career.” Neil Sandell suggested that it’s better to take something than nothing. Sure you can be fussy and have high expectations, but, Neil said, “you never know from the outside what a job is going to be like, and you never know what kind of learning you’ll acquire. You don’t know where [a job] is going to lead.” Listen to our inspiring archived interviews.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

When is a good time to write the next chapter in your career and life story?

Apr
16

the number 33, the jesus yearIt’s spring and the cycles of nature show us it’s a time for renewal. The natural world is reviving, flowers blossoms, trees bud, and your career and life can be aligned with this powerful cycle. Check out this short video linking career and life choices to spring’s inspiration. Easter celebrates the renewal STORY of resurrection, which happened when Jesus was 33 years old. Some call this the JESUS YEAR — a time to clarify what you want in your career and life. Here’s the thinking: If Jesus could be credited for all that was accomplished in his life by 33, then anyone approaching that age might want to assess where they’re at and what they want to do next. But how to answer, “What next?” Sidestep those silly career tests, and instead draw on the power of YOUR STORY – it holds all the clues you need.
What do you think about the Jesus Year? How are your being inspired this spring? Leave a comment!

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

The ‘quiet disaster’ of youth unemployment

Apr
12

Apr 11, 2012

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How can we avert the ‘quiet disaster’ of youth unemployment?

On Wednesday, April 11th, Career Buzz offered an engaging hour of radio featuring Senior CBC Radio Producer Neil Sandell on what he’s learning in a year focused on youth unemployment.

In Canada, youth unemployment is about twice as high as the national average. In Ireland, Italy, and Spain, youth unemployment hovers at 40%. Twenty-somethings, some with multiple degrees, are searching for work in their field one and even two years after graduating. Those with only secondary education are falling further behind. Why is this happening? What can be done?

“Long term unemployment and underemployment among young adults represents a profound squandering of talent, education, and creative energy,” says Neil Sandell, Senior CBC Radio Producer, winner of an Atkinson Foundation award focusing on youth unemployment. “It is dispiriting for the individual. For society, it is a quiet disaster.” Neil has been examining the causes of unemployment among young adults and investigating solutions to the problem that “frustrates young adults and confounds their parents.” He shared stories about what he’s found to be effective programs and best practices to address the issue. Neil’s professional home has been the CBC for more than 25 years. Based in Toronto, he has worked on As It Happens, Quirk n Quarks, IDEAS, and Outfront.

We also heard from young adults in their own words. Peter Donnan graduated in 2011 with a major in psychology from Queen’s University, found an unpaid internship, then was offered a full time position with the company after they realized he was looking for work elsewhere. Michael Panos just found a great job with the help of Youth Employment Services (YES), after leaving university.

Nancy Schaefer, President of Youth Employment Services and Author of Good WORK!, also joined us and helped us understand all the different kinds of people we’re talking about when we use the word “youth,” and what her organization is doing to support them.

SPARKs from Career Buzz on March 28: When is a good time to look for a job? “Yesterday,” said Recruiter Jack Nodel of AReS Staffing. Always keep your eyes open for “strong opportunities that feel correct to you and offer you fulfillment in all areas. It should be an ongoing process.” Jack emphasized the importance of people-to-people connections. “Living that life of building good relationships, referring good people to other people, will lead you into the referrals you’re looking for. When you refer John to Michelle and you open that connection… I’ve learned in my life and career that those investments will be your most fruitful, and those investments will make much more of a difference than hitting the send button on a web-based [job site] that will give you a couple seconds of hope.” Listen to the whole interview

CareerCycles Tip: Be on the lookout over the next few days for an opportunity to introduce two people in your network who should know each other. Make that connection, by email or social media or in conversation. Then stay open to the positive clues you’ll notice.

Inspire your life, empower your career, enrich your week. Join us on WEDNESDAYs 11am-noon at 89.5 FM or www.ciut.fm Listen to our inspiring past shows

Make the connection. Contact Jennifer Mackey, Client Service & Office Manager, at 416 465 9222 or at service@careercycles.com for an initial career conversation. Remember, a referral is sending someone you care about to someone you respect. Please don’t keep us a secret.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

by Mark Franklin

Practice Leader at CareerCycles, Toronto-based career management social enterprise: career counselling, employee engagement, training.

 

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